advice you can use — short and to the point — every Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015 technology  research  practice

A Research Tip

  • Research & Writing

Last week, I gave a shout out to Ted Tjaden for sharing some info about deep linking to LexisNexis Canada sources, and I am continuing to thank Ted this week. Ted shared some information about deep linking into WestlawNext Canada.

Deep-linking to the Canadian Abridgment:

https://nextcanada.westlaw.com/Browse/Home/AbridgmentTOC/TOR.XVI.6/View.html (this should be strict liability, rule in Rylands v Fletcher)

When you are in the Abridgment, you can usually get the abridgment schema code and simply insert it in the foregoing URL.  The portion of the URL above that is the schema code is TOR.XVI.

I have had good luck with jumping to a browsing page for WestlawNext Canada content by copying a URL link from anything that is hyperlinked. This method requires first going to the service and then copying the URL.  For instance here is a link to the Saskatchewan Queen’s Bench Rules (2013):

https://nextcanada.westlaw.com/Browse/Home/TextsandAnnotations/LitigatorTextsandAnnotations/SaskatchewanRulesofCourtAnnotated?guid=Iff55e4893d671f4ee0440021280d79ee&originationContext=documenttoc&transitionType=Default&contextData=(sc.Default)

The string is not quite as comprehensible as Ted’s example for the Canadian Abridgment, but it still works, even with a sign on interruption.

The point of Today’s Tip is to not be afraid of deep linking. The fact that I can only read part of my copy & paste URL to know that I am linking to the Saskatchewan Rules is acceptable. Knowing that I will have to update the link if the platform has a major change (like from eCarswell to WestlawNext Canada) doesn’t outweigh the benefit of making the links and using them while they work.

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